Turmeric is one of nature’s greatest gifts

Turmeric has enjoyed a great reputation within India for many generations now. Best known as one of the ingredients used in curry dishes, it’s also responsible for ballpark mustard’s yellow color. It’s been utilized for quite some time in Indian and Chinese societies for the anti-inflammatory results. Also it provides when dealing with a wide array of medical conditions. Turmeric also shows great promise when faced with the task of fighting various forms of cancer.

Turmeric, also known as curcuma longa, naturally grows in the very warm regions of South Asia. It requires a lot of rain and constant temperatures ranging between 20°C and 30°C in order to bloom and prosper. Its main active component is calledcurcumin, which has a somewhat bitter, peppery taste combined with a mustard smell.

Turmeric not only prevents dementia but can reverse dementia symptoms

If you or a loved one suffers from Alzheimer’s Disease or some other form of dementia. There is hope and healing to be found in turmeric. Based on the recent findings of three independent case studies, turmeric, whose primary active ingredient is curcumin, has the power not only to heal both the behavior and psychological symptoms. That is  associated with dementia, but also help lead to full recovery of the disease in as little as just a few months.

A traditional cooking spice that has been used copiously throughout India and Southeast Asia for many millennia, turmeric has been the subject of myriad scientific studies in recent years. The circulatory, digestive, and neurological systems of the body, it turns out, are all positively impacted by turmeric, and the seemingly never-ending list of diseases for which the spice is known to provide healing is continually expanding all the time.

Turmeric outperforms cholesterol-lowering drugs?

Another study on mice predisposed to heart disease was conducted by researchers from Kyungpook National University in South Korea and published in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research in 2011. In this study, the mice were fed a high cholesterol diet that was supplemented either with curcumin, the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin or a placebo. After 18 weeks, the researchers found that just like lovastatin, curcumin lowered blood levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, while increasing levels of HDL (“good”) cholesterol. It also led to changes in gene expression. And that could be expected to reduce the risk of artery damage and heart disease.

“Long-term curcumin treatment lowers plasma and hepatic cholesterol and suppresses early atherosclerotic lesions comparable to the protective effects of lovastatin,” the researchers concluded. “The anti-atherogenic effect of curcumin is mediated via multiple mechanisms including altered lipid, cholesterol and immune gene expression.”

Turmeric for your heart and health

Lowering cholesterol and fighting arterial disease are not the only ways that turmeric improves the health of your heart, or of your body as a whole. In a trio of studies published between June and October 2012, researchers from the University of Tsukuba in Japan found that curcumin supplements improved two measures of heart health as much as an aerobic exercise program. While a combination of the two lead to even more dramatic benefits. A combination of curcumin and exercise was also found to significantly slow age-related degeneration in the heart.

Studies have also suggested that turmeric and curcumin can help fight infection, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and numerous forms of cancer.

The body absorbs curcumin best from turmeric root, rather than from supplements. As seen in the 2004 study, evidence suggests that the greatest health benefit comes from consuming curcumin. And other “nutraceuticals” at low doses over a long period of time, rather than from short-term, high dosage schedules.

As good for your heart as exercise

Turmeric is not just good for the hearts of people with autoimmune myocarditis; in fact, several studies conducted by researchers from the University of Tsukuba in Japan suggest that it may be as beneficial for your heart as aerobic exercise!

In a pair of studies published in the journals Artery Research and Nutrition Research in September and October 2012. The researchers found that women who took a curcumin supplement showed as much improvement in two measures of heart health. As women assigned to a moderate aerobic exercise training program. An even greater benefit was seen, of course, in those who took the supplements and engaged in the exercise program as well.

Turmeric battles hard-to-treat Auto Immune conditions

Because turmeric is such a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. Numerous studies have been conducted to see whether it could be effective.  To reduce the severity of inflammation-based autoimmune diseases.

In autoimmune diseases, the body is attacked by its own immune system. These diseases are still poorly understood, and most of them have no known cause or cure. Common autoimmune diseases include type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, myocarditis, thyroiditis, uveitis, systemic lupus erythromatosis and myasthenia. An estimated 5 percent of the world’s population suffers from anautoimmune disease.

According to a research review published in the journal Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biologyin 2007, curcumin has been shown various results. Such as reduce the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis in humans or animals. As expected, symptomatic relief comes, at least in part, from the regulation of inflammation pathways.

Nevertheless, at least one trial suggests that daily curcumin doses of up to 8 g . That might be safe for up to four months or longer.